hand-knit scarf: behind the scenes

hand-knit scarf: behind the scenes

Granted, I had other priorities besides knitting a scarf this year – like keeping a rambunctious two-year-old alive. Which is no small task, FYI.

But still, really? A whole year to knit a scarf?

Tell me you've had a project like this: one that gets dragged out so long that it isn't fun anymore. But you've committed, so you can't bail, like a bad relationship that won't get better – or die.

This was my bad relationship of the year. Every time I took my needles out to get a few rows done, both Lars and our cat, Heathcliff, started to pull at the yarn, rip out rows of stitches or use the needles as samurai swords (Lars did that, not the cat). One time I walked into the living room to see a yarn installation winding around the bannister and sofa, into the dining room and around a chair as Lars yanked stitches out and Heathcliff tried killing the scarf like it was a rabid squirrel. Just a few hours of work lost in three minutes. Not fun.

But I am still glad that I persevered and saw it through to the end. If it was truly a bad relationship that wouldn't be such a good idea. Because bad relationships can get abusive and ugly. Not pretty like this scarf.

The reality is that the act of making is not always pleasant or fun. But that doesn't mean it's not worth it. Sometimes there is drudgery and slogging through. Sometimes it all seems pointless and dull. Sometimes it seems easier to chalk up a project as a failure and a loss . . . because it all just seems too hard.

But these are the times when commitment matters, when the original vision has to be remembered and fought for. Because without commitment nothing can be accomplished. Giving up would always prevail – which would be really sad.

And this is what motivated me to finish the darned scarf: to show Lars that commitment is important no matter how frustrating it can get. That we can rely on our own abilities and skills and don't have to buy everything in life from a store. That to be a stellar example of a maker, homesteader and creative mom takes commitment.

And commitment takes cojones, strength and loads of endurance. Which is worth it, because finishing a project feels so good.

I believe in passing down creativity and self-reliance to my son - that is why I try to make as much as I can

But I don't think I'll be making another scarf anytime soon.

cat-owls: drawings for a new line

cat-owls: drawings for a new line

why kids should garden

why kids should garden

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